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20130117
20130125
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
foreign policy challenges. >> usama bin laden in documents that came out of abadabad quoted as urging his cohorts to go to other places. to get away from the airplanes. get away from the drones. he specifically encouraged al-qaeda to disburse. and they did. >> senator john kerry is expected to be confirmed next week as america's top diplomat, replacing the former senate colleague who introduced him. he will face multiple crisis across the middle east. >> every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. every day that goes by it gets worse. >> so there is, it seems to me a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding. and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months. and 60,000 dead. >> republican senator marco rubio said the obama policy on syria has been so disorganized when the situation is resolved, the people there will hate the u.s. >> as iran's best friend. grand central station for terrorists all over the world it was in our national interest to help an opposition form organize itself. >> iran's nuclear program, kerry reiter
obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try something -- you have to try something new if you want to accomplish his ambitious agenda this type. >> there are reports that algeria special forces have captured five of the kidnappers involved in the past plant incident. they are looking at the side recovering bodies. >> half how many of the hostages seen in the -- how m
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
's foreign policy, aid related or diplomacy in our presence throughout the world. you know, if you look back to, say, congress can 20, 25 years ago, it was essentially made up of people who had a relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of u.s. global engagement, the marshall plan and the rebuilding of japan and america's presence. and the relationship also, i mean, and the lessons and the threat posed by the cold war. and those were very defining, major umbrella issues that produced great statesmen, henry jackson and others, on a bipartisan politics at the water's edge, america's presence b and engagement around the world. two superpowers of the um real la that kind of -- umbrella was kind of held over the world and stifled the kind of regional and local factions and tensions that erupted after the end of the cold war. that all had a significant impact on the american people and commitment, i think, and support for the commitment for the u.s. to be a global, globally engaged, the superpower. um, it was the possibility of a five-alarm fire, and everybody's in to try to keep th
think there was a pretty strong sense today that not just on domestic policy, but even on some foreign policy, he moved. sometimes the criticism was he kept a little too much of bush, this was a breaking point. a lot of what lingered, some of the people, some of the policies seem to be pushed back now. >> was this the speech that liberals have been waiting for? >> sure it was. >> and now is it the foundation for the next several years? >> well, barack obama is a complicated man. we have to be honest about him. >> he is a deal maker. >> yeah, he is. and he is also a mediator. he really does believe in trying to bring people together. so we can't tell ourselves that he is going to give us everything we want. but what i thought from this speech was that he was saying, look, i know where you're at, the people who elected me. i know the coalition that elected me. if you keep the noise up, if you keep talking about this, i'll take care of you. i will watch for you. and he wasn't tossing them all under the bus. this was not a hey, i know you elected me, but now i can't do much for you. >> was
with president george w. bush and foreign policy will be happening in the second term. >> the first thing that strikes me on a day like today is what a wonderful celebration this is with our democracy. the peaceful transfer of power. of course president obama is being affirmed again, but we look at our institutions. you see the supreme court justice swear in the president. it's a wonderful thing and it's something that when you've traveled around the world, not every country can take this moment for granted. when the will of the people is confirmed and affirmed the way we're going to see today. >> the president is speaking to the world, he's speaking to the united states, he's speaking to the people in washington and he's speaking to republicans. what does he need to say to republicans? >> on inaugural day, it is really the high point for any presidency, i think, because after that we start to get back to our regular criticism, and we did this wrong and that wrong, and so i would hope the president would use the opportunity to say i've won the election, but this
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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